PASTURE RAISED - GRASS FED BEEF ☞NO HORMONES ☞NO ANTIBIOTICS.

PASTURE RAISED - GRASS FED BEEF ☞NO HORMONES ☞NO ANTIBIOTICS.
Also naturally fed, pasture raised, chicken, turkey and pork.



Friday, March 14, 2014

Waiting For Spring

I do not know about you, but I am tired of snow and winter. Wish spring would hurry and get here.

I have been working on the 2014 order form and the spring news letter to go with it. In the letter it will talk about a few changes for 2014. The main change for this year will have to do with the pork shares that are offered. Over the past few years we have only offered our Mangalitsa pigs to restaurants and not in shares to everyone. Instead we would purchase young regular breed pigs and raise these for share holders. This year we are not going to bring in regular pigs for shares, we have enough Mangalitsa to offer them to share holders. Between having plenty of Mangalitsa pigs and a decease running through many regulars pig herds throughout the USA. I will not be bringing in outside pigs to the farm.

What does this mean for you??

It means that you are going to be getting a great deal on pork that is served in some of the best restaurants in the world as a gourmet dinner. Yes the price per pound will be a little higher than regular pork, but will only run about $60 per share more than usual. Mangalitsa dinners are often a $100 per plate, so $60 extra for 30lbs of gourmet meat is not that much.

It also means that the chops and roasts will carry a good 1/2 inch thick of fat. The Mangalitsa is known for its fat. A fat known to be very flavorful and higher in omega 3's. The bacon will also carry a lot more fat (and cooks very fast.)  The meat will be redder in color

You can find a lot of info about the Mangalitsa pigs on the internet, if you want to know more.

Feel free to contact me with any questions or concerns.

Hope all is well with you and yours.

Dan

Saturday, February 1, 2014

Winter Chores

Hello Everyone.
I do not know about you guys, but I have had enough of this winter weather. In some areas I have had to trudge through 3 foot snow drifts to do chores. We are running out of room to push the new snows . So far all of the animals seem to be holding up to the extreme weather we have been having. Wish I could say the same for some of our equipment. Tractors are harder to get started in cold weather and I have buried the tractor in the snow once already and had to get another farmer with a much bigger tractor to pull me out.  Good thing we raise a pig with the nick name of wooly pig. All of that wool like hair has been a great help in keeping them warm.

It won't be long and it will be time to get order forms in the mail. My goal is to get them out to everyone sometime in March.

Looking forward to Spring.
Hope all is well with you and yours.

Dan

Tuesday, December 24, 2013

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year

The Hiday Family would like to thank everyone for supporting the Hiday Family Farm. For many of you it was your first season with us, we thank you and hope to have you back with us in 2014. Even more of you have been with us for several years now,  we thank you for your loyalty and support. When things get tough around here, you are our inspiration to keep going. Many of you have become friends and feel like family.

Speaking of family, Holly and I are busy getting ready for a Christmas that will include two new daughter-in-laws and two new granddaughters. We are Excited.

Looking forward to 2014.

Here's wishing you and yours a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.

Dan, Holly and Family

Thursday, December 12, 2013

Snow and Cold

Hello,
How is everyone doing? I am often asked and if you haven't asked I am sure you have wondered. What Makes The HIDAY FARM different. That is a tough question sometimes, because a lot of things make us different. As I sat at the kitchen table watching the cattle grazing in the snow I realized how different we are from many farmers who also raise cattle.  Most of the other farmers around us started feeding hay and/or grain in September or October. Me, I took one field that is 17 acres in size and grazed first thing in the spring. I grazed it for about two weeks and then pulled the cattle off. Then I let the field grow and grow to do what I call stockpiling. It really grew this year, so in August I put six young female calves in it to keep them away from the bull.(do not want any teenage moms) These six had very little impact on the grass as far as grazing it down.  The week before Thanksgiving I did a flip flop with the cattle. I took the main herd and moved them from the 30 acres they were in, because it was 75% eaten. However it does have enough grazing in it for the six in the 17 acres. Then the main herd went to the 17 acres. Even with 2 inches of snow my cattle are grazing on the stockpiled grass. And this is December. I finally decided to take a bale of hay to them because it was so cold and blowy. I Took The Hay to Them in the Field. A 1000lb bale, that I took to the field and put next to a Brier patch. Why? One, the cattle will tramp that Brier patch into the ground and destroy it or at least stunt it for next year. Two, by taking the hay to the field I am keeping the manure they produce in the field. Instead of bringing the cattle into a barn lot, I will move hay bales all around the fields to control weeds and spread the manure around for next year. This saves time, saves labor, saves fuel, improves the land and most of all, saves old Farmer Dan's back. You would think this would be the norm, but it isn't. This is how we have raised cattle for over 20 years and one of the examples of what makes the Hiday Farm special.

Thought you might like a little insight into what we do.

Hope all is well with you and yours.
Merry Christmas and Happy New Year.

Dan

Thursday, November 28, 2013

Happy Thanksgiving

Just wanted to wish everyone a Happy Thanksgiving. We spent the day with the boys and their families. Two new little granddaughters to spoil today. It was a fun day.

Hope all is well with you and yours.
Dan

Saturday, November 16, 2013

Turkey

Hello everyone, it has been a very busy fall. I have seen and delivered probably 90% of the product to date. I have logged a lot of miles and have had a chance to say hi and visit with many of you. I love visiting with everyone.
I do need to get a second trip made up to the Detroit shareholders. I will be calling and setting that up real soon.

Also, Kalamazoo customers who have turkeys ordered. I will have them with me at the special Holiday Farmers Market at Texas Twp. Saturday , November 23rd. from 4 to 7PM. I will be in my usual spot.

Hope all is well with you and yours.

Dan

Monday, October 28, 2013

Growing Family

Hello everyone. It has been very busy since my last post. On October 19th. our second grandchild/granddaughter was born to Adam and his wife Becky.

All of the beef for individual shares has been taken in for processing. Everyone should have their beef within the next 3 weeks.

Pork will also be done soon.

Turkeys are growing better than last year and will be going in soon. So several of you may also see your turkey sooner than normal.

I always look forward to this time of the year because I get a chance to see and visit with all of our shareholders.

Hope all is well with you and yours. See you soon.

Dan